Research chairs

The Department of Community Health Sciences includes five research chairs who conduct research with the aim of improving knowledge and furthering ideas to improve community health. As leaders in their fields, our research chairs reflect the diversity of interests of the department.

The following faculty members hold Canada Research Chairs:

Dr. Brenda Hemmelgarn - Roy and Vi Baay Chair in Kidney Research
Dr. Deborah Marshall – Arthur J.E. Child Chair in Research
Dr. Frank W. Stahnisch – AMF-Hannah Professorship in the History of Medicine and Health Care
Dr. Hude Quan - Chiu Family/AstraZeneca Chair in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Dr. Lindsay McLaren -  CIHR/PHAC Applied Public Health Chair


AMF/Hannah Professorship in the History of Medicine and Health Care

Chair: Dr. Frank W. Stahnisch

Dr. Frank W. Stahnisch

Dr. Stahnisch's research attempts to create in-depth understanding for the development and necessities of basic research in medicine and the health sciences.  It further places medicine and health care in the wider context of society and culture with their specific traditions of healing, inquiry, health care and patient support.

His expertise lies in a number of areas, such as the history and philosophy of laboratory-based research in Western medicine, the long history and theory of the nerve and brain sciences, as well as the history of public mental health and psychiatry.

Being trained as a medical doctor as well as in philosophy of science, Dr. Stahnisch became particularly interested in the history of medicine as it allows the nature of often ground-breaking changes to be uncovered that not only gave rise to health research, as we know it today, but also separated other time-periods and cultures from one another. In the increasingly globalized and flexible world of today, such historical in-depth knowledge helps us to better understand the concepts of health, disease, suffering, research, and healing - not only in Western societies, but also in continuously merging cultures worldwide. 

Dr. Stahnisch has published widely on the history of experimental biomedicine and the neurosciences, including one monograph on 19th century French experimental physiology and another monograph on the after-effects of laboratory physiology in Central Europe.  A third monograph on early developments leading to the neurosciences as an interdisciplinary field in the 20th century is currently under review.
 


Arthur J. E. Child Chair, Rheumatology Health Outcomes Research

Chair: Dr. Deborah Marshall

Dr. Deborah Marshall

In July 2012, Dr. Marshall was appointed the Arthur J. E. Child Chair, Rheumatology Health Outcomes Research.  Through this appointment, Dr. Marshall will develop a world-class rheumatology program in Alberta, with translational research focusing on clinical and health outcomes research, promote interdisciplinary care and collaborative research ultimately promoting the liaison between rheumatology and related research. She will work to attract students, fellows, research associates and faculty interested in rheumatology and act as the spokesperson for the Arthur JE Child Foundation.

Dr. Marshall is a health systems economist with research interests including economic evaluation of health care programmes using decision analysis methodologies, testing and treatment interventions in personalized medicine, methods for measuring patient preferences in the evaluation of medical interventions, and health technology assessment, particularly health system evaluation using operations research methods such as system dynamics modeling in musculoskeletal disease and cancer.
 


The Roy and Vi Baay Chair in Kidney Research

Chair: Dr. Brenda Hemmelgarn

Dr. Brenda Hemmelgarn

The Roy and Vi Baay Chair in Kidney Research was established in 2011 in recognition of a generous founding gift from Roy and Vi Baay to the Kidney Foundation of Canada. The purpose of the Chair is to promote clinical excellence by developing and maintaining a world-class kidney disease research program for southern Alberta; with a mission to develop a world-class clinical research and academic program housed within the Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, that focuses on the evaluation and improvement of health care delivery for patients with or at risk of kidney disease. 

Dr Brenda Hemmelgarn has been the Chair-holder since 2011. The Chair has supported a variety of activities including an Assistant Professor in Health Services Research, fellowships for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows, a “core support unit” to support and foster academic research activities and funding support for clinical trainees and junior faculty to support their research and academic activities. 
 


Chiu Family/AstraZeneca Chair in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Chair: Dr. Hude Quan

Dr. Hude Quan

The Chiu Family/AstraZeneca Chair in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention was created to tackle cardiovascular disease through a long-term commitment to increasing public health knowledge. Initiatives the Chair aims to accomplish include promoting and leading healthy living programs for cardiovascular well being; developing and fostering a world-class research program that garners peer-reviewed funding; and working with provincial and national organizations including Alberta Health Services to promote cardiovascular well being.


CIHR/PHAC Applied Public Health Chair

Chair: Dr. Lindsay McLaren

Dr. Lindsay McLaren

The CIHR/PHAC Applied Public Health Chair aims to generate knowledge that will address knowledge gaps related to dental public health as well as to generate knowledge that will represent scholarly innovation in population health and health equity.

To address this goal, Dr. McLaren has collaborative research projects focused on several aspects of community water fluoridation and dental health; including:

  • Exploring the short-term impact of community water fluoridation cessation on children's dental caries;
  • Studying the decision-making process surrounding cessation of community water fluoridation in Calgary;
  • Engaging in critical analysis of the shift from community water fluoridation (a universal or population-level preventive strategy) to interventions targeted at vulnerable populations (a high-risk or targeted preventive strategy);
  • Exploring practice adaptations by dental hygienists in response to cessation of community water fluoridation;
  • Examining the association between fluoride exposure and health outcomes related to cognitive and thyroid functioning in a national population-based sample of Canadians;
  • Exploring parents' online discussions about children's dental health;
  • Identifying challenges and opportunities for public health communication about community water fluoridation and other population-level interventions.

The findings from this research have the potential to significantly enhance the knowledge base on fluoridation and oral health, as well as yield important insights for public health decision-makers.