Finding a supervisor

While a supervisor is not necessary, they can be beneficial throughout your academic career. A supervisor is an academic faculty member who serves as a mentor for a graduate student currently completing their MSc or PhD thesis work. Finding a supervisor is an important process as they’ll be your mentor and adviser, and you'll work together closely throughout your graduate career.

The important first step in finding a supervisor is research. You should review the available supervisors’ academic profiles online and even read a few of their publications. This way, you can be sure to select a supervisor that has a record of research and publication in your area of interest. You should also become familiar with their supervision style - and even contact former and current students to see if the relationship would be a good fit. 

Once you’ve done your homework, it’s time to contact potential supervisors. A brief introductory email is the best way to start. Ensure your email is professional, and be clear with your intention to work with them in the upcoming academic year. Your email should also tell the potential supervisor more about yourself - including points about your background, previous research you’ve been a part of and even people you’ve previously worked with. You have to make a case for yourself - but you have to make sure the relationship is realistic as well. Be sure to ask about availability during your program period, and determine if they're planning any extended absences during that time. 

When researching potential supervisors you should always talk to several professors before asking one to become your supervisor.  Once a potential fit has been made, you can arrange a future meeting to discuss further. 

Here is a list of the faculty member currently accepting supervision for the 2019-2020 academic year:
 

Community Health Sciences

Masters | PhD

Community Medicine

Masters

Disability and Community Studies

Masters