Our Projects

Projects

The research being conducted by the Human-Animal Studies and Health Promotion Team is grounded in the guiding principles of One Health, which highlight the dynamic interdependence that exists between people, non-human animals, and ecosystems.

Our active projects explore the health promotion implications of these complex interactions using a variety of approaches, ranging from the public health salience of dog-walking as a means of attaining physical activity and social engagement, to the social justice implications of ways that society views human-animal relationships.

Active Projects:

Multispecies families, communities and publics in a 'model city' for companion animal welfare - an analysis of the 'Calgary model' for the regulation of companion animals, where we focus on the implementation of bylaws regulating pet-ownership.

Pet Bylaws and Population Health - a study of the implications of bylaws regulating pet-ownership with respect to population health of both pet-owners and non-owners in urban and rural areas.

Social Justice and Pet Ownership - a qualitative investigation of barriers to positive experiences with pets, especially for members of populations that may be at risk of being marginalized due to socio-demographic attributes like age, housing insecurity, and socio-economic status.

Public Policy, Inter-Professional Teamwork and Dog-Aggression – a multi-pronged investigation of policy and practice options to redress dog-aggression, injuries from dog-bites and associated trauma.

Completed Projects:

Off Leash Parks and Public Health - a longitudinal exploration of off-leash policy, media coverage, and activity patterns in park spaces used by dog-walkers and non-dog-walkers.