Dr. Sean Dukelow

Dukelow

Sean Dukelow, MD PhD FRCPC

Associate Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

University of Calgary
Faculty of Medicine, Kinesiology
Department of Clinical Neurosciences
3330 Hospital Drive NW
Calgary, AB  T2N 4N1 

Office: Room 905D South Tower, Foothills Medical Centre
Lab: Room C1102, Foothills Medical Centre

E-mail: robotlab@ucalgary.ca

Research Gate:  Dr. Sean Dukelow

For clinical matters, please contact administration: (403) 944-5930

Biographical Information

2008  

F.R.C.P.C., Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Queen's University, Kingston ON Canada

2003  

M.D., University of Western Ontario, London ON Canada 

2002  

Ph.D., Neuroscience, University of Western Ontario, London ON Canada

1996  

B.Sc., Human Kinetics, University of Guelph, Guelph ON Canada

2015 - Present

Associate Professor, University of Calgary, Calgary AB Canada

2008 - 2015

Assistant Professor, University of Calgary, Calgary AB Canada 

2003 - 2008

Post-Doctoral Fellow and Resident, Queen's University, Kingston ON Canada

2019

  • Canadian Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Paper of the Year

2016

  • Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation AARP Administration Award
  • Canadian Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Paper of the Year

2014 

  • Teaching Excellence Award
  • 8th Canadian Comprehensive Review Course in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

2012  

  • Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation AARP Excellence Award

2010  

  • The John Latter Award for Resident Teaching in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

2008  

  • Heart and Stroke Foundation of Alberta, NWT, and Nunavut Investigatorship in Stroke Rehabilitation Research

2003

  • The Dr. John Agnos Memorial Award in Diagnostic Radiology

Research Interests

My core research involves better understanding and facilitating neural recovery and rehabilitation in humans. A key focus has been developing robotic assessment and rehabilitation tools for use in stroke. We are also involved with research in traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In addition to our work in robotics, we have a number of studies that integrate non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) and neuroimaging. These two techniques help us to better understand how the brain works and NIBS may be helpful in restoring lost brain function. Recently we have started some work in virtual reality. Our research spans fundamental neuroscience questions to larger randomized clinical trials in the hopes that we can improve the lives of those who require neurorehabilitation. 

I am currently Medical Director for Stroke Rehabilitation in the Calgary Stroke Program and the Research Director for the Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation’s resident training program, where I work with our residents to ensure a solid foundation in research methods.