Community Pediatric Asthma Service

Asthma and School

Asthma and School

Asthma is the most common chronic illness in children and the #1 reason for missing school in North America (associated with colds and flu).  September has the highest number of hospital emergency visits, hospital admissions and doctor visits for asthma, which is why this time of the year is often referred to as the "September Asthma Peak". 

Back to School with Asthma

School & COVID-19

School is looking different this year.  Here are some excellent resources for parents and children to help make the transition.

 


In and Out of School

When you start a new school year, be sure the teacher knows you have asthma.  This will help them understand that you need quick and easy access to your reliever medicine. 

When you are on summer vacation, don't take a vacation from your asthma medicine.

When you are getting ready to go back to school, check your Asthma Action Plan and make sure you are not part of the September Peak.  September is the time of year with the most Emergency Room visits for asthma.

September Ashma Peak (video)

The September Peak

Most children with asthma use their asthma medicine on a regular basis, but if you stopped taking your asthma preventer/controller inhalers, pills and nasal sprays during the summer, start taking them again before school starts. Emergency visits for asthma peak in mid-September, a few weeks after kids go back to school and start sharing their viruses!  Our Asthma Educators have made a list of helpful tips to help prepare for the September Asthma Peak:

  • A short video about the September Spike
  • Know where to check the expiry dates on all your asthma medicine
  • Children with known anaphylaxis should carry an EpiPen to school every day
  • Children with allergies should carry their EpiPen with them at all times.  They should also remember to wear their MedicAlert bracelet or get one if they don't have one
  • Ask your pharmacist to review your child's asthma medicine device technique
  • Avoid your asthma triggers and get the flu shot as soon as it is available
  • If you have any asthma questions, see your doctor or talk to your school nurse, pharmacist or asthma educator

Resources for Teachers

Teachers play an important role in the care of our child's health. With the goal of keeping teachers informed about asthma, we have found the links below very helpful:


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Material on this website has been designed for information purposes only. It should not be used in place of medical advice, instruction and/or treatment. If you have specific questions, please consult your doctor or appropriate health care professional.