27th Annual Cumming School of Medicine Symposium

Featuring innovative speakers from around the world who are driving research in health science disciplines. 

SAVE THE DATE: May 3rd, 2019

About

For 27 years, the Cumming School of Medicine Symposium has gathered top scientists from around the world who are making a difference in health-related sciences. From personalized medicine development to global HIV prevention initiatives, the Symposium aims to encompass a diverse range of speakers that will be of interest to students, staff, and faculty of the various departments and institutes within the Cumming School of Medicine. 

Save the date: May 3rd, 2019
Time: 8:30am - 4:00pm, graduate student dinner to follow
Location: Libin Lecture Theatre

  1. Morning Talks

    Opening remarks – 9:00 – 9:15 – Libin 

    Dr. Ken Poole – 9:15 – 10:15 – Libin 

    Coffee break – 10:15 – 10:30 – HMRB atrium

    Dr. Jeff Iliff – 10:30 – 11:30 – Libin

  2. Lunch

    11:30 – 12:30 – HRIC atrium

  3. Afternoon Talks

    Dr. Lillian Sung – 12:30 – 1:30 – Libin

    Dr. Ben Goldstein – 1:30 – 2:30 – Libin         

    Coffee break – 2:30 – 2:45 – HMRB atrium

    Dr. Andrei Krassioukov – 2:45 – 3:45 – Libin

    Closing remarks – 3:45 – 4:00 – Libin

  4. Graduate Student Dinner

    Barcelona Tavern – 6:30 pm

Dr. Ken Poole – Addenbrooke’s Hospital, University of Cambridge

“Just Big Boned. Towards a Cure for Osteoporosis”

Dr. Ken Poole is a physician at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, and a Reader at the University of Cambridge. His team has a strong focus on understanding and treating human bone and joint diseases. His group collaborates with the Engineering department on state-of-the-art methods to diagnose osteoporosis and osteoarthritis with 3D imaging. Their novel methods have been used to identify focal bone defects that lead to hip fracture, and to determine the beneficial effects of various new drugs and exercise regimens on bone health. With Bristol researchers, they study the genetics of excessively high bone density, and identified a family from Cambridge whose specific mutation disrupts the binding of an important bone protein sclerostin, leading the family members to have some of the highest bone density measurements ever recorded. In the lab, Ken discovered the location and timing of sclerostin expression by osteocytes in human mineralized bone samples, in a paper that has now been cited 745 times. His team recently used 3D imaging to map the effects of clinical blockade of the same sclerostin protein in 24 women with low bone density, showing that the drug increased vertebral bone density by almost a quarter within a year.

Dr. Jeff Iliff – School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University

“Sleep-wake regulation of glymphatic-lymphatic coupling in the aging brain and Alzheimer’s disease”

Studying vascular physiology and the regulation of cerebral blood flow in his early career, Dr. Iliff completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Washington and his Ph.D. in Physiology and Pharmacology at Oregon Health & Science University. Then, as a postdoc in the lab of Maiken Nedergaard at the University of Rochester Medical Center, Dr. Iliff helped to define the ‘glymphatic’ system, a brain-wide network of perivascular spaces that facilitates the clearance of wastes, including amyloid beta and tau, from the brain interstitium during sleep. Dr. Iliff returned to OHSU in 2013 over the next six years established his research program and was promoted to Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Basic Science in the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine. There, his group has demonstrated that the glymphatic system fails in the aging brain and in the young brain after traumatic brain injury (TBI). These studies suggest that impairment of glymphatic function may be one factor that renders the aging brain vulnerable to protein aggregation and neurodegeneration and may link brain trauma early in life with the development of dementia in the decades that follow. Ongoing work in his lab seeks to define the molecular and cellular underpinnings of impaired glymphatic function in the aging and post-traumatic brain, and to use novel MRI-based imaging approaches to extend these findings into clinical Alzheimer’s disease and post-traumatic populations. In 2015 he and his collaborator Bill Rooney of the OHSU Advanced Imaging Research Center were named Allen Distinguished Investigators in Alzheimer’s Disease, an award that supports the development of novel MRI-based approaches to measuring sleep-wake changes in glymphatic function in the human brain.

Dr. Lillian Sung – The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto

“Enabling Evidence-based Symptom Management – Lighting the SPARK”

Dr. Lillian Sung is a Full Professor and Senior Scientist at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. She is certified in the specialties of pediatrics, infectious diseases, hematology and clinical investigation. She completed a PhD in Clinical Epidemiology from the University of Toronto. She has a clinical research program focused on improving supportive care for children with cancer. Her methodological focus is on randomized and observational trials, meta-analysis, and patient-reported outcomes. She is the principal investigator on multiple operating grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Dr. Ben Goldstein – Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto 

“Heart Matters: Bipolar Disorder as a Vascular Disease”

Dr. Goldstein received his MD from the University of Calgary in 2001 and is now a child-adolescent psychiatrist and Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology at the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, as well as Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the Director of the Centre for Youth Bipolar Disorder and Director of Research in the Department of Psychiatry at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and a Senior Scientist at Sunnybrook Research Institute. Dr. Goldstein’s efforts focus on teenagers with, or at familial risk for, bipolar disorder. His team seeks to identify clinically relevant biomarkers, and innovative prevention and treatment strategies that focus simultaneously on physical and mental health. Dr. Goldstein has authored over 150 scientific articles, and has received international awards for his research, most recently the Colvin Prize from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. His research is currently funded by grants from Brain Canada, CIHR, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, NIMH, and the Ontario Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science. An active educator, Dr. Goldstein serves as Director of the Clinician Scientist Program in the University of Toronto’s Department of Psychiatry.

Dr. Andrei Krassioukov – ICORD, University of British Columbia

“Till Death Do Us Part: An optimistic view on the pessimistic reality of autonomic dysfunction following spinal

cord injury.”

Dr. Andrei Krassioukov is a clinician-researcher devoted to helping people with SCI maintain their cardiovascular health. His focus is on a condition commonly known as autonomic dysreflexia (AD), a condition familiar to the majority of individuals with SCI as well as their caregivers. It is characterized as ranging from unpleasant to debilitating episodes of increased arterial blood pressure that can be commonly introduced by very simple stimuli, such as a tight belt or inappropriate wheelchair positioning. Without timely recognition and management, the condition can complicate and lead to life-threatening situations. Dr. Krassioukov is the Associate Director of Rehabilitation Research for ICORD. He is also a Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of British Columbia, and a physician in the Spinal Cord Program at Vancouver Coastal Health’s GF Strong Rehabilitation Centre. He obtained his M.D. from Volgograd State Medical School, Russia, and his Ph.D. from Ivan Pavlov Institute of Physiology, Russian Academy of Science, St. Petersburg, Russia.