G. Campbell Teskey

Professor

Cell Biology & Anatomy

Deputy Department Head

Cell Biology & Anatomy

PhD (Doctor of Philosophy)


Contact information

Phone

Office: 403-220-4692

Web presence

Google Scholar

PubMed

Location


Research

Research Summary

My CIHR-funded research program is primarily concerned with how seizures alter brain function. My laboratory has recently discovered that following a seizure the arterioles constrict in the brain areas involved in the seizure. This constriction leads to reduced blood flow and an oxygen debt which causes acute behavioural problems. We are exploring the consequences of this stroke-like event and have determined which biochemical pathways are involved. This has led to the identification of drugs that prevent the seizure-induced vasoconstriction and the downstream problems. This is important because epilepsy can be a fatal disease and we are in the process of identifying treatments which prevent seizure-induced death as well as the less severe but important behavioural impairments and brain dysfunction.


Biography

G. Campbell Teskey is a Professor at the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI), University of Calgary with his main appointment in the Department of Cell Biology & Anatomy and currently lead the Epilepsy, Brain and Mental Health Team. He has PhD. (U.W.O.) and post-doctorate (McMaster) training in Behavioural Neuroscience. The Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) are his principle funding sources. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and is the recipient of numerous teaching awards. Dr. Teskey served as Education Director of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Scientific Officer for the Behavioural Sciences, a committee at CIHR. He currently is Deputy Department Head for Cell Biology and Anatomy. 

Dr. Teskey has principally focused his CIHR-funded research program towards understanding how seizures and epilepsy alter behaviour, neuronal networks, as well as cellular & synaptic functioning. He was the first to show that seizures lead to; 
1) a long lasting and severe hypoxic episode that negatively impacts neuronal function and behaviour, and
2) altered motor map expression, which has implications for interictal behavioural co-morbidities. He is also keenly interested in discovering and translating ways to prevent and reverse the neural reorganizing effects of seizures. His NSERC-funded research program is geared towards understanding the development, anatomy, plasticity and neurobiology of motor map expression. 


Publications

PubMed


Awards

2018 Faculty of Graduate Studies GREAT Supervisor Award

2016 McCaig-Killam Teaching Award